GeekyBeach Metal Detecting

GeekyBeach Metal Detecting

Metal Detecting & Lost Item Recovery

Author: GeekyBeach

Is Metal Detecting Really All That Difficult? Can I find something I lost on my own?

First, I’ll start by saying something important: if you want to become a metal detectorist or even just try it out…you should! Don’t let any fears about difficulty keep you…

First, I’ll start by saying something important: if you want to become a metal detectorist or even just try it out…you should! Don’t let any fears about difficulty keep you from trying. Just like any other interest, you should assess the risks and understand some basics so you are prepared and compliant with any potential laws or rules, and ethics. The purpose of this article is to share some thoughts about how to get started with a metal detector, the difficulty levels, and getting beyond the stereotypes.

Getting Started

One of the most common questions I hear and read from people who are interested in metal detecting but haven’t started yet is: “what kind of metal detector should I buy?” Before you make the leap into a particular detector, here are some things to try first.

  1. 1. Find a Local Shop – There are many different options out there, but my first recommendation is to search your local area for a metal detecting store. If there is a store near you, that is going to be the best way to get great advice and even hold a detector in the store to try it out. Ask all the questions you have and they will help you get started.
  2. Find a Local Club – If you don’t have a shop near you, the next step is to search for a metal detecting club nearby! You might be surprised to find that there is a club near you and typically you can find their website or Facebook page to interact with members. Tell them you are interested and would like to give it a try. You may find that they hold local regular meetings where you could ask questions.
  3. Check out the Library – If you don’t have a shop or club near you (or if you are a bit shy), you might check your local library to see if they have a “library of things” and check to see if they have a metal detector. If they don’t, it might inspire them to think about adding one!
  4. Spend Some Time on YouTube – If you can’t find someone in the hobby to chat with locally and aren’t ready to make a decision on purchasing a metal detector, spend some time watching YouTube channels about metal detecting! I know many new detectorists who started this way and learned a lot from others.

Difficulty

Metal detecting can range in difficulty depending on your physical abilities, your patience, and your equipment. The basic physical requirements for detecting can suit almost anyone. It’s easier if you have good walking ability, balance, and have the stamina for the arm motion required. It also involves some digging and the difficulty there depends on two things: where you search, and the tools you use.

Where you search

Your environment will play a big role as well. Many new detectorists are surprised to find that there are many rules regarding metal detecting and it’s not always clear where you are welcome to search. It will take some patient research to determine where you can detect.

If you live near beaches and parks, you’ll want to know what department is responsible for that beach. For example, national parks (beaches and park grounds) are off limits to detecting and can lead to some uncomfortable encounters with law enforcement and even hefty fines. It’s also important to abide by a common set of metal detecting ethics at all times.

This is a list of common ethics that metal detectorists follow:

  • Do not trespass; always respect private property and do no metal detecting without the owner’s permission.
  • It is advisable to get permission in writing, and to get agreement in writing first to avoid disputes regarding the ownership of any subsequent finds.
  • Never do anything that might contaminate wells, creeks or other water supplies.
  • Respect the country code, leave gates as they are found, do not damage crops, never deliberately disturb wild or domestic animals.
  • Never litter, always gather or collect any trash or debris you create or find.
  • Leave as little sign of your passing as possible.
  • Always use the correct digging or probing equipment to make the least intrusion or marks.
  • Always fill in your holes, including ploughed fields and beaches.
  • Never throw trash finds back in the hole.
  • Report the discovery of any items of possible significant historical value to a local historian or museum in accordance with the latest legislation of your area.
  • Never go metal detecting around archaeological monuments.
  • Report any live ammunition or other potentially lethal or toxic objects you may find to authorities after carefully noting or marking the location. Do not attempt to move or interfere with any such devices.
  • Report all finds to the landowner/occupier.
  • Protect the metal detecting hobby by being a good will ambassador at all times.

The list above is from https://www.minelab.com/support/customer-care-charter/code-of-ethics

Avoid purchasing detectors from unknown/untrusted brands.

Quality of your tools

The quality of your detector will also contribute to how easy or difficult it is to find objects. Inexpensive detectors tend to be “detect it all” style – that means they will respond to all metal in the same way when you pass over them. This can make it more difficult since you won’t have an idea of what you’re digging until you find it. As detectors become more expensive, they tend to have greater and greater ability to provide more feedback about what you might be passing over. This allows for making a decision: “to dig or not to dig?”

Avoid purchasing detectors from unknown/untrusted brands unless you’re comfortable with the low price and low expectation of quality. The most common trusted metal detector brands are:

    • Garrett
    • Minelab
    • Bounty Hunter
    • Teknetics
    • Nokta
    • Fisher
    • XP Metal Detectors

I recommend you do some reading and research about the brand and model of detector you’re thinking about. And visit a local shop if you can! (Fellow detectorists, if you believe there is a brand that should be on the list above, please contact me and submit your suggestion!)

 

The quality of your shovels and/or sand scoops will make a difference too. A cheap sand scoop may break under the weight of heavy wet sand. The number of items you carry can make it more difficult to search if you don’t have a way to carry them! A waist-buckled bag can do the trick.

A man reaching into beach sand to retrieve a coin found with a metal detector.Can I find my lost item myself?

Of course you can! I would never discourage anyone from giving it a try if they would like to find their own lost ring or other item. But I would say it’s important to understand the conditions that will make it easier to attempt on your own. I will often get calls from people who lost something and bought a detector themselves but were unable to find it. So why weren’t they successful?

One thing that’s easy to forget when you’ve lost something important, is that there is often a bunch of other things buried in the same area as your lost item. If you lost it on a beach, it’s even more likely that your item is surrounded by buried bottle caps, soda pop tabs, and other foil trash from visitors. All these objects contribute to a search taking longer because a metal detector can’t tell you with 100% confidence the type of object below you!

The other difficult thing can be the size of the search area. If you aren’t sure of where the item was lost, it can mean searching a very large space. Each of these difficulties are things that metal detectorists learn how to manage over time.

So how do metal detectorists narrow it down?

This comes back to the equipment. As someone who does this work often, I have invested in a high-quality metal detector that has more powerful features than detectors commonly found for sale at low prices. No metal detector (yet) can provide 100% confidence, but I can narrow it down and not waste time digging up rusty nails. You will see me dig up pop tabs when looking for gold rings though! (If you’re curious to know why this is, you could do some more research on conductivity of metals!)

If you lost your item in a fairly clean area where it wouldn’t be too deep in soil or sand, and you feel confident that it’s in that area…you may be able to find it yourself with a simple metal detector and some patience!

Stereotypes

When I share that I am a metal detectorist with new people, I get a range of reactions. Some people immediately smile and say, “I’ve always been curious about that! What’s the best thing you’ve ever found?!” Others give me a blank stare and might pretend they’re interested by asking if I ever find anything valuable.

Just like any other interest, metal detecting has some stereotypes associated with it and it’s hard to know how someone will react. Each culture has its own perceptions too. In the United States, some see it as a “hobby for old men.” Some people even laugh when they see someone metal detecting and assume we’re just looking to strike it rich or struggling to find enough to pay off the price of the detector!

One time, a person walking by on the beach made eye contact with me and then threw out a quarter just ahead of where I was searching because they “felt sorry for me.”

It’s not all negative though. Many others stop to ask questions and smile as they talk about how fun they think it looks. And of course there are others who’ve witnessed first hand how metal detecting can lead to recovering a lost item like wedding rings and more.

Summary

Metal detecting is a wonderful hobby that is suitable for many personalities. Just like other hobbies, it can be more complex than it looks to bystanders, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t give it a try!

 

P.S. If you want to help support me in my metal detecting efforts, please visit my “Support” page!

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Sentimental Ring Recovered in the Park

I received a call from a young lady who lost a sentimental ring that belonged to her late grandmother. It always tugs at my heartstrings when I hear from people…

metal detecting ring recovery

I received a call from a young lady who lost a sentimental ring that belonged to her late grandmother. It always tugs at my heartstrings when I hear from people who’ve lost something so special, and I definitely do what I can to help as a metal detectorist.

In this case, the loss was in an area where special permissions were needed in order to legally search. After a long wait, I finally received the “okay” that we needed. When I arrived, both the young lady and her mom were present and willing to get their own hands dirty in the search.

The grass was damp – the location was near a sprinkler head and it was the cause of the loss as well! A quick rinse in the powerful spray of the sprinkler caused the ring to fly off. When it happened, she searched the area including into a really massive shrub! But after multiple attempts to search, she thought it might be lost forever.

I started the search near the sprinkler head in question, and we started noticing a lot of trash signals that caused interference with each other. We pulled up the trash items just slightly below the surface, and we knew that the ring would likely be just below the surface as well.

After circling outward from the sprinkler, we checked under the shrub, but came up with only foil trash. We were about to call it quits – assuming that maybe someone had picked it up before we were able to search. But I know to always give it one more try.

Back near the sprinkler where we removed some trash signals, we had a fresh signal on the detector. I had the young lady check the spot carefully and I heard her gasp – “no way!” And just below the surface, likely stepped on when initially searching, was her grandmother’s ring. Here is just after that moment captured on video:

This young lady and her mom were both willing to get their hands dirty and it paid off. Even though she had searched the area herself many times before I was called out to help – she didn’t give up! It was a team effort that paid off.

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What conductivity have to do with metal detecting?

As you start or progress in the hobby of metal detecting, you’ll come across many terms and among them, conductivity. Conductivity is a physical property of materials that describes their…

As you start or progress in the hobby of metal detecting, you’ll come across many terms and among them, conductivity.

Conductivity is a physical property of materials that describes their ability to conduct electrical current. It is a measure of how easily electric charges, typically electrons, can flow through a substance. Materials with high conductivity allow electric charges to move easily, while those with low conductivity impede the flow of electric charges.

Here is a list of common metals in order from high to low electrical conductivity:

Silver
Copper
Gold
Aluminum
Zinc
Brass (a copper-zinc alloy)
Bronze (a copper-tin alloy)
Iron
Nickel
Platinum
Lead
Tungsten

This is a general ranking, and the electrical conductivity of materials can vary slightly depending on factors like purity and temperature. However, this order represents the typical trend in electrical conductivity for these metals.

So what does that have to do with metal detecting?
When you’re researching a metal detector, you’ll often see the frequencies listed like 1.5 kHz – 100 kHz. A higher frequency is ideal for detecting low-conductivity and small metals, while a lower frequency is effective for high-conductivity metals like silver.

Some metal detectors are equipped with discrimination features that can help distinguish between different types of metals based on their conductivity. This allows you to have some idea of what type of metal might be buried below based on the signal that returns!

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Tiny Gold Ring

I had the most adorable ring finding experience last week! A hopeful dad contacted me because his daughter accidentally lost her special baby ring while playing with a friend in…

I had the most adorable ring finding experience last week! A hopeful dad contacted me because his daughter accidentally lost her special baby ring while playing with a friend in the yard.

She wasn’t supposed to be playing with it, but we all remember being a kid and only doing what our parents said, right?! I shared a story about how I opened a collectible Barbie doll that was hiding in the closet when I was kid thinking I could repackage it so that mom would neeeever know. I was wrong. ; )

Both dad and daughter joined me to search their front yard. She even wanted to learn how to use my pinpointer to help me search! After a long, sweaty search, we were about to call it quits. Maybe the ring ended up somewhere else?

But I’ve learned over many past experiences that just when I’m about to give up, that’s when I need to give it another shot. Sure enough, about ten minutes into that last attempt…there it was, face down between the grass blades. The tiniest ring I’ve ever seen!

tiny gold ring

I had a hard time finding it because I was using an 11″ coil and it ended up being very close to the concrete driveway. It was a difficult process to carefully use the pinpointer to check along the perimeter, but it worked!

We all learn through these experiences as kids and even as adults. It’s okay – get out there and learn something new as a result!

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What can you learn from a metal detecting lesson?

Metal detecting is such a fun activity, so I am always happy to hear from people who are interested in taking a lesson with me on the beach. But what…

Metal detecting is such a fun activity, so I am always happy to hear from people who are interested in taking a lesson with me on the beach. But what can you learn from a metal detecting lesson that you can’t get from YouTube?

This past Groundhog Day, I had the great joy of sharing my metal detecting tips and tricks with a new student on a California State Beach. One of the services I provide through GeekyBeach Metal Detecting are metal detecting lessons in the San Francisco Bay Area. Anyone – even if you don’t own a metal detector – can take a one-on-one lesson with me and see what it’s really like to comb the beach!

Every lesson is different – I customize the experience based on your interests. One thing you can’t get from watching videos is the physical feeling of being out with your detector, learning what it should feel like and how to wrangle your equipment. Especially if you have purchased a new detector, it helps to know the best way to set it up and the quirks it might have.

Metal detecting lesson student stands on a San Francisco Bay Area beach

New detectorist D.H. did a great job learning to use his new detector on a windy winter beach!

 

A review:

“I couldn’t have chosen a better instructor to start out my adventure as a detectorist at a beach. Laura brought a depth of knowledge with regard to knowing where to pick good potential grounds to search and also showing me the best approach to fine tuning my recently acquired Teknetics T2 SE. Laura is an excellent instructor for beginners like myself. If you are starting out, it’s well worth your time to have her show you the ropes as metal detectors are getting more complicated and better nowadays.”

– D.H., San Francisco Bay Area

You can learn a lot by watching videos online, but getting out and learning in person is hard to beat. I was really impressed with D.H.’s great questions and willingness to try different approaches – I can’t wait to hear about his future finds! 

Metal detecting is about more than finding treasures. In addition to being mindful about trash we find, we also clean up hazards that are just below the surface. There are often rusty and sharp objects, batteries, and lead. I’m so glad he found a small pair of scissors that would really hurt if someone found them with their foot!

Metal detecting lesson student holds up items found while searching the beach

D.H. holds up some of his finds – he definitely saved someone from those scissors!

 

So what can you learn from a metal detecting lesson? How to have more fun at the beach! If you’re looking for a unique adventure in the Bay Area for yourself or your family, consider a metal detecting lesson!

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Hillside Ring Recovery

I received a call on the evening of Jan. 3, 2023 from a man whose wedding ring fell off on his property – a steep hillside home. He had searched…

I received a call on the evening of Jan. 3, 2023 from a man whose wedding ring fell off on his property – a steep hillside home. He had searched for a while and was hoping a metal detector would make the job easier.

It was already dark, but with an enormous winter storm predicted for the following day, there was a bit of urgency to find it quickly before heavy rain could wash it farther down the hill. Though it would be dark and the hill already damp from prior rain, I decided to venture out equipped with headlamps and hope.

What happened?

He was unloading groceries from the trunk of his car when the ring flew off his hand and started rolling down the driveway. He managed to see it happen and watched the ring, figuring it would stop on the concrete. Nope! His ring apparently had a daredevil streak – it launched itself off the concrete over the side of the road and down the hill next to the home.

I brought my Minelab CTX3030 and Equinox 800 (Minelab Metal Detectors ). When I arrived, he had assistance from three other men who were exploring the slope. As a transplant only one year ago from flatter than flat parts of the country, I’m still new to and intimidated by hills. I offered to give a quick lesson on the lightweight Equinox since they were far more adept with the hillside than I would be.

I set up the Equinox properly for the situation and target, and gave one of the gentlemen a crash course: easy…listen for the bleep! Then off he went down the hill while I checked out another spot that was easier to access. Within about 10 minutes or so, I heard the happy words: “Found it!”

Mens wedding ring shown in the hand of its owner after recovery on hillside.

My box lantern illuminates the owner’s hand after his ring was recovered.

Because they had all been searching for probably a couple hours, this was a major relief and exciting moment. I was particularly happy that even though I didn’t find it myself, I was able to bring the joy and excitement of metal detecting to another person. And of course relief to the ring owner!

It was a smart move by the ring owner to call someone with the right tool, and the experience to set it up quickly and properly for the situation.

This goes for many parts of life – not just for metal detecting. We can often feel like trying to handle obstacles on our own either personally or professionally. The additional help along with a metal detector made the recovery happen much quicker. And in my case, handing off the detector to someone with better hill skills!

There is perhaps no better example than asking you to imagine the last time you tried to DIY something in your home and it wasn’t as simple as you thought. Plumbing quickly comes to mind for me. I’m sure we all have examples from our professional lives as well.

In this case and so many others, it’s worth calling on your fellow villagers for assistance!

Lose something special? Call a RingFinder! RingFinders is a global directory of metal detectorists just like me who can help you recover lost metal objects.

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A Metal Detectorist is Never Off Duty

A neighbor, Carrie, posted on the social network NextDoor that she had lost a special pendant. It had belonged to her mom and she gave some details in her post…

A neighbor, Carrie, posted on the social network NextDoor that she had lost a special pendant. It had belonged to her mom and she gave some details in her post about where she was walking before noticing that it was missing.

“I was walking with my dog, and the area could include top, middle, and lower parking lots, benches behind the campus overlooking tennis courts and a pool, a loop around the back of the property, and back down to the parking lots.”

Whew…the area she mentioned was large – a big property with multiple buildings and places to walk and sit.

Because of the large possible search area, I didn’t feel confident that I’d have any luck. I wasn’t even sure that it would require a metal detector. But it was a beautiful day, so I decided it would be a nice place to walk and just keep my eyes open – no detector required.

I walked through the parking lots, up some stairs to buildings and I put myself in the shoes of someone walking their dog.

Not too long after arriving, I saw what I thought might be the benches she mentioned in her post. Thinking about how people generally sit down and mess around with clothing, removing purses and bags, I decided to check under and around the benches. I also knew to look THROUGH the bench slats in case it would be easier to see on the ground.

Wooden park bench with slats

Turns out…it did fall through…but not all the way! There it was – wedged in the slats just out of reach by hand. I was able to gently fish it out with my pocket knife and car key.

Pendant lodged inside a bench slat

I was so happy to call Carrie and get it back to her that evening. She was very happy, and teary-eyed as she told me that was a special bench for her and her mom. A place for her to always feel like she’s still with her even now that she’s passed.

I don’t always push myself to try things that don’t seem likely to work out, so this was a good reminder to go for it (and to have some faith in my eagle eyes.)

Missing necklace pendant recovered - hand showing the pendant

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How Metal Detecting Supports My Career in Technology

When I’m not metal detecting, you can find me working in the field of technology. Many people who are not familiar with metal detecting think that it must mean I’m…

When I’m not metal detecting, you can find me working in the field of technology. Many people who are not familiar with metal detecting think that it must mean I’m on a never-ending search for pirate treasure! More often, it means that I’m helping someone with a problem that requires a bit of … digging.

I often receive calls from people who have lost something special (like wedding rings, phones, you name it). In those moments, I have to put on my detective hat and grab my equipment. There’s my metal detector, of course, and scoops or shovels to do the digging, but I also have to dig into the story behind the loss.

Recovering Lost Items

man holds a wedding ring on the beach after recovered with a metal detector

A relieved husband holds his wedding ring after I recovered it on the beach!

Interacting with someone who has just lost a potentially expensive, cherished item involves asking lots of questions and being emotionally aware. I can’t be afraid to prod for as much as they can remember when their item went missing. In some cases, I have to help calm their nerves a little bit so they can think clearer. Sometimes I have to help them see that their memory may not be accurate!

In all cases, I put myself in their shoes: I walk the same path and imagine how they interacted with the environment. “Hmm…maybe they tripped over that rock and their item went flying into the leaf pile! … I’ll check it out.”

I am often able to reunite them with their lost item and the hugs and smiles in those moments are hard to beat. Other times we are both left with a mystery. In those moments, I always tell them to keep looking. Check all the odd places they’d never imagine (like this story with an unusual ring location!) It’s also healthy if they can come to terms with the loss, but still keep their eyes open just in case.

Thinking from the customer’s perspective

This isn’t too far from what I do in my work life. I love asking questions and thinking about how people behave. So this metal detecting hobby of mine allows me to flex the same muscles in a different way.

Working in technology requires a lot of thinking from someone else’s perspective. It also means talking to your audience directly and learning from their experiences. In the end, it’s all about improving an experience – a better website, a more effective system, a more entertaining mobile game, you name it.

If you’re looking for a problem-solver to join your business team, you might need a metal detectorist to help your business strike gold. 😉

Schedule a Meeting with Laura now!

An illustration of a work desk filled with books and paper, with a metal detector leaning against a desk chair.

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What is Metal Detecting?

I hear a lot of questions from interested passersby when I’m out detecting. But some of the questions I see come from Google searches on the subject of metal detecting….

I hear a lot of questions from interested passersby when I’m out detecting. But some of the questions I see come from Google searches on the subject of metal detecting. Things like:
What is the point of metal detecting?
Is metal detecting a good hobby?
Is metal detecting legal in the US?
Can metal detecting make you money?

I’m happy to answer each of these questions and more! But let’s start with a little lesson about how metal detectors work and the first question: What is (the point of) metal detecting?

What is the point of Metal Detecting?

This is a rather blunt way of phrasing the question, but believe it or not it’s a commonly searched phrase on Google. Using a phrase like “what is the point” makes it sound like people don’t understand the hobby. And you know what…maybe they don’t! It might seem obvious to those of us who are already in the hobby, but others might feel that it looks boring.

The “point” of metal detecting varies. For some of us, it’s just about getting outside and feeling the excitement of finding something. There’s a special thrill of locating a target and discovering what it is. It’s hard to explain to someone else how exciting it is. Maybe they need to just try it – (take a lesson with me!)

For others, the purpose can be recovering lost items, assisting police departments with recovery of bullet casings and weapons, and less common but still relevant: locating property or utility lines with specialized equipment.

A man reaching into beach sand to retrieve a coin found with a metal detector.

How Metal Detectors Work

A metal detector has three main components: a search coil, a shaft and grip, and a display. A metal detector transmits an electromagnetic field into the ground below you from the search coil at the end of the shaft. There are different shapes of the coil, but it’s generally round or oblong in shape. When the field from your coil passes over a metal object below, the object becomes energized and emits a signal of its own. A metal detector is designed to “detect” that retransmitted signal and alert you on a display.

If you want a longer lesson on metal detecting, have a look at Minelab’s article about metal detectors.

Is Metal Detecting a Good Hobby?

This is very subjective, but I would say…yes! First, you need to know thyself. If you are not interested in the time required, cleaning up after yourself, and working hard before finding something interesting…it may not be for you. Many people enter the hobby because they want to find gold rings on the beach. But many more say that they are just curious! That curiosity is the best indicator that it might be a great hobby for you.

It might take you 300 targets before you find anything you find interesting, or you could find something neat right away! Also, if you just like the idea of cleaning up buried objects, that’s a great attitude to have. Ideally, we are all contributing to cleaner public spaces.

Is Metal Detecting Legal in the US?

Yes and no! It depends where you want to use a detector. National Parks…nope! Always be sure to check before you detect. Even local or state parks can have rules, permitting processes, or special restrictions. You want to be aware of those and any other hazards before you detect.

You should even be careful before digging in your yard! If you aren’t familiar with the location of utility lines, you could be in for a shock. There’s a reason utility companies have “CALL BEFORE YOU DIG!” stickers all over their vehicles. It’s worth being careful.

Can Metal Detecting Make You Money?

Possible, but not likely. Again this really depends on what you’re hoping to do with the interest. There are definitely careers in metal detecting where you might focus on locating objects for police departments. But if your idea is to find enough gold to pay yourself a hefty salary, that is very unlikely. Many detectorists do cash in the coins they find during the year and that can get into the hundreds of dollars on average. If you live in a tourist area and know the swimming spots (and want to dive in the water), you can find bigger items.

Items of large value should be reported to the local police. Many detectorists do everything they can to locate the owner of a valuable or sentimental item like rings and phones. Check out all the cool YouTube videos available on ring and phone finding!

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Is it in the trash?

In mid July, I was contacted by a couple who lives just about 15 minutes down the highway. The husband had lost his wedding band somewhere on their property, and…

In mid July, I was contacted by a couple who lives just about 15 minutes down the highway. The husband had lost his wedding band somewhere on their property, and they had reason to believe it might be in the trash.

The scene: Husband and wife were cooking dinner in the kitchen. Dealing with chicken, husband takes off ring for the nasty parts.

It was only later after the meal was over and the kitchen cleaned that he realized “oh no…where’s my ring??”
They spent all night looking for it and didn’t want to put the cans out for pickup unless they felt confident that his gold ring wasn’t in there, so they contacted me the next day to help!

I drove out to meet them, and we all searched through the contents of the trash looking for any potential gold signal from my metal detector.

During the process, it started looking like the ring wasn’t in the trash, so I went through my list of usual questions: Did they check the sink drain? Vacuum bag? Leftover containers? Other normal spots he might set it down?
They hadn’t found it anywhere. This was their last hope.

Unfortunately, we didn’t find it either. No signals in the trash that weren’t just foil. It’s always hard to leave without locating the ring. 🙁

A little over a month later I got a text message: “Hi Laura – happy to let you know we found the ring! It was tucked away in between the pages of a cookbook and feel out when we took it off the shelf.”

Even when you think you’ve exhausted all the possibilities, leave it to life to present you with the unexpected. And maybe a new favorite recipe.

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